Elsewhere de Selby makes the point that a good road will have character and a certain air of destiny, an indefinable intimation that it is going somewhere, be it east or west, and not coming back from there.

If you go with such a road, he thinks, it will give you pleasant traveling, fine sights at every corner and a gentle ease of peregrination that will persuade you that you are walking forever on falling ground. But if you go east on a road that is on its way west you will marvel at the unfailing bleakness of every prospect and the great number of sore-footed inclines that confront you to make you tired.

And if a friendly road should lead you into a complicated city with nets of crooked streets and five hundred other roads leaving it for unknown destinations, your own road will always be discernible for its own self and will lead you safely out of the tangled town.

from Flann O'Brien's The Third Policeman
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